Tag Archives: Moroccan cuisine

Ghoriba, Moroccan macaroons

Ghoriba Semolina Cookies

Excerpted from Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen

Makes about 4 dozen

 Did you know that the ancient Egyptians, Babylonians, and Greeks, all cultivated sesame seeds and sometimes used them as packing material? Ghoriba are the most popular cookies in Morocco.

3/4 cup (about 4 1/2 ounces) sesame seeds, toasted

2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

1 cup fine semolina

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 1/2 cups powdered sugar

1/4 stick butter, at room temperature

3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Powdered sugar for sprinkling

 

In a wide, shallow bowl, mix sesame seeds, flour, semolina, baking powder, 1 1/4 cups of sugar, and butter. Slowly add the oil, stirring vigorously. Turn it onto a lightly floured board and knead until dough is thick and elastic. This could take up to 10 minutes. Let dough rest for 20 to 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Take one tablespoon of dough, and with your hands, roll it into a 1-inch ball. Set on a greased or non-stick baking sheet and flatten it with your fingers to 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Continue in this manner until all dough is used.

Bake until cookies turn light brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool slightly, then transfer to a wire rack with a spatula. Sprinkle with remaining powdered sugar.  Store in a metal tin.

The Kasbah Chronicles: October November 2020

These seals at Oceanside Harbor have the right idea: Wake me up when COVID is over…

MUSINGS

The Kasbah Chronicles

Les Chroniques de la Kasbah

In English and en français

Musings

Notes on my next cookbook

A new twist on a Moroccan classic

Links of interest

News of Morocco and beyond

Improve your spoken French!

Moroccan items for sale

Musings:

In this, the ninth month of the COVID pandemic, I am at a loss for words. I cannot complain, since our Vista Kasbah is the best place for me to be sequestered—but boy, am I getting itchy feet. Yet, the idea of getting on an airplane still does not appeal to me.

Actually, the pandemic has served an exciting purpose: I have been hard at work on my next book, Bitter Sweet: legacy from my Alsatian ancestors (working title). Beautiful food photography included too!

I received an email blast from the High Atlas Foundation, a most worthy NGO in Morocco :

https://mailchi.mp/highatlasfoundation/article-reviving-a-monastery-for-community-development?e=4GUbJ49kBE. Unpublished article on Tioumliline by Lamia Radi, Rabat, Morocco.

Toumliline remains a magical name in my mind. Toum as we all called it, was a refuge for Catholic nuns in the Middle Atlas Mountains. It was a popular destination and Catholic retreat for many of my Catholic friends, especially at Easter:

“On part a Toum….” they would announce… each year.

Those among you who accompanied me to Morocco will remember the longest day of the trip as we crossed the Atlas Mountains from Fez to the oasis of Tinehrir. Half way up, Tioum hides among the forest of cedar trees not far from the snow slopes of the Mishliffen. Macaques on the way to Toum…

The very first avocado from our very own tree..

 

Let’s head to the kitchen

 new twist on egg tagine with lox

Morocco meets Brooklyn

(variations in Cooking at the Kasbah, The Vegetarian Table: North Africa and Mint Tea and Minarets.)

do you get the idea I love this egg dish?!!

Egg Tagine with Olives and lox

Serves 4

Make the tomato chermoula sauce ahead of time:

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, very finely diced

1 (14¼-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained

½ teaspoon sugar (optional)

10 green or purple olives, rinsed, pitted, and coarsely chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 bay leaf

¼ cup minced cilantro

In a tagine or medium skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Cook onions, stirring occasionally, until golden, 8 to 10 minutes. Add tomatoes, sugar, olives, garlic, and bay leaf. Mash lightly with a fork. Reduce heat to low and simmer until tomatoes thicken somewhat, 15 to 20 minutes. Discard bay leaf. Add cilantro.

Adapted from Mint Tea and  Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories.

For ONE person:

One egg, beaten

1 or 2 slices of lox, diced

Pour the egg in a small oiled skillet. Swirl around as for an omelet. Salt and pepper to taste. Top with 2 tablespoons of the chermoula, and diced salmon.

Copyright Kitty Morse 2020

More: The French are crazy about “crumbles” savory or sweet. Who knew that “crumbles” (and biscuits d’Halloween) would make such an impact?

Crumble de courgettes  au Parmesan

Serves 4

  • 4 T olive oil
  • 4 medium zucchini, peeled and sliced very thin
  • 4 T flour
  • 2 T bread crumbs (or almond meal)
  • 1 cup grated parmesan
  • Ground pepper to taste
  • 4 T butter, softened
  • 4 slices of ham or prosciutto (optional), cut into ribbons

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Bring the oil to medium heat in a pan or skillet. Saute the zucchini slices until soft. Drain and set aside.

For the crumble, combine the flour, bread crumbs, parmesan, and salt. Add the softened butter and mix with your fingertips. Alternate layers of zucchini, and ham (if using) in a medium baking dish. Top with the crumble mixture and bake for 20 to 25 minutes.

My friend Stephenie Coug

hlin, owner of Seabreeze Farm in Del Mar (CA) a mere 2 or 3 miles from the ocean, grows and delivers her own GORGEOUS produce. Heck her out!

https://csa.farmigo.com/store/seabreezed

News of Morocco, France, and beyond:

Casablanca is undergoing a renewal, and hopefully a getting a good coat of paint. We lived on Avenue Hassan II, across from the park, one the city’s main arteries. This is what our building looked like in the earl 1920s…a beautiful Moorish art deco structure. it needs a new coat of paint in this century. Local casablancais have finally realized what an architectural treasure they have in downtown Casablanca..

https://aujourdhui.ma/culture/un-programme-de-mise-a-niveau-du-centre-ville-historique-de-casablanca-voit-le-jourIl+s’articule+autour+de+quatre+projets+Dans+le+cadre+du+plan+de+sauvegarde+et+de+valorisation+du+patrimoine+de+Casablanca,+la+Société+de+développement+local+Cas :

MOROCCAN ITEMS FOR SALE:
PLEASE VIEW DEDICATED PAGE ON THIS WEBSITE

Bellows, camel leather, copper and wood. ABout 48 years old.. Works fine.

 

All these will appear on my dedicated page.

These lithographs were produced by he same printer who printed my first book, Come with me to the Kasbah. Printer and publishing house are long gone

I am asking USD70 a piece. Shipped in a tube. About 23.5 by 15. 5 inches.

,

Le Riad au Bord de l’oued: winner (translation) Gourmand World awards

What a lovely surprise to wake up to this message on December 1, 2019

Le riad au bord de l´oued  is the Winner for Morocco in the Gourmand World Awards in the category B12 Translation .

You now qualify to compete for Best in the World 2020  with winners from other countries in the same category. This year a total of 225 countries participated in the competition. You can see  the complete list of winners 2020 on www.cookbookfair.com

The following link will give you a General Presentation of the Gourmand Awards, including our Gourmand World Summit 2019 at UNESCO, the International Village of Gastronomy in front of the Eiffel Tower, and the  awards ceremony in Macao. last  July

https://www.cookbookfair.com/images/pdf/Gourmand_Awards_General_Presentation_2019_11.pdf

Your book will be in the events next year. . .”
Congratulations and best wishes for 2020

Edouard Cointreau
President

Onwards!

Please like the Facebook page or the Amazon.com listing. Every little thumbs up helps, I am told!

https://www.facebook.com/Le-Riad-au-Bord-de-lOued-110970043646415

Visit Le Riad page on this website.

Merci!

 

The Kasbah Chronicles: Sept/Oct 2018: My Next tour to Morocco

BIG NEWS!! JOIN ME IN MOROCCO
After a twelve-year hiatus
I will  go “home again” and join forces with
ADVENTURES BY THE BOOK

Adventures by the Book is pleased to invite you to join us on a once-in-a-lifetime trip to experience the culture and cuisine of Morocco with world-renowned chef and author Kitty Morse!

Coming out of retirement after 12 years, Kitty has graciously offered to escort us on an Adventure to her breathtaking country of birth for perhaps the very last time. For 10 days and 9 nights, we will visit 7 different cities on excursions such as a winery lunch, camping in the Sahara under the stars, a camel ride, visiting local markets, a special tea at Kitty’s family’s riad, and so much more!

We aim to provide intimate and unique Adventures, so this trip is limited in size, and we expect it to sell out quickly! To learn more, or to download a Registration Agreement and reserve your space on this amazing trip, visit OUR WEBSITE
http://adventuresbythebook.com

We’ll see you in Morocco, Adventurers! 

Adventures by the Book 

[P.O. Box 421472, San Diego, CA 92142]

 [(619) 300-2532]

MUSINGS:
In my backyard
OH! NO! FIGS AGAIN!

Catalina Island Rediscovered
Merci, Mr. Wrigley

Overheard
At the beach

San Diego Book Fair
Lobster Taco=WOW!

Vive le bilinguisme :
Pourriel?? (YOU MUST read the explanation)

From Morocco and beyond

Kitty in the media:
Paella a la Californiana

California Center for the Arts: New Show!

MUSINGS:
Figs again . . .

Many of you have followed the saga of my fig tree over the last two years. It became so prolific, and so heavy we had to chop it down. But we made cuttings. Now, they are reaching for the heavens. This summer, they produced just enough figs to share with birds, rabbits, and possums…but not enough to make jam or chutney. I’ll wait. LONG YELLOW figs developed specifically for our San Diego County micro-climate, are still the best I have ever tasted.

Kitty 2 for 2
The blue jay got there first!

Once the handful of figs harvested, we headed out of town for a return trip to Catalina Island off the coast of Long Beach (CA). I have written about Mr. Wrigley’s utopia before. Each time I set foot in Avalon, I am struck by the chewing gum magnate’s vision: He conceived the island as a holiday destination for everyman, nurturing the environment and excluding cars. The anchor remains its extraordinary art deco Casino, still the principal attraction.
Since we had explored Avalon on previous occasions, we decided to take a boat ride to Two Harbors, a diminutive beach nestled on a sandy crescent 50 mn up the coast. I can’t recommend this boat ride highly enough, especially on a sunny day. Two Harbors is also the narrowest point on the island, and you can walk from one side to another in about 20 minutes. We faced a small flotilla of sailboats bobbing in the emerald water during lunch on the beach, in an atmosphere reminiscent of a Mediterranean hideaway.

I announced the San Diego Book Fair in my last Chronicles. This is an event well-worth attending with dozens of authors from San Diego and beyond, and a wide-ranging children’s book section. Adventures by the Book (tour to Morocco organizer!)and Novel Network, my hosts for the event, had secured a prime spot at Liberty Station.

Kitty with Selina of ABTB
Shamefully, I had never set foot at this San Diego landmark located on the grounds of an old military base. No wonder Old Town San Diego has fallen into the doldrums. Its “authentic” depiction of the first settlement in the state is dusty and somewhat drab. Liberty Station, on the other hand, vibrates with activity, houses a couple of museums (New Immigrants Museum and a Museum of Comedy, I think?)..dance studios, stores, restaurants, and vast expanses of lawn for picnics and other events. A fun place in spite of planes landing and leaving Lindbergh Field. https://libertystation.com/directory/all
My main goal after signing a few books was to look for the FOOD! And the Liberty Public Market offered something for every palate: Lobster tacos anyone? https://libertystation.com/go/liberty-public-market.


Kitty in the media:
Coronado, CA (another utopia!) the “island” in the middle of San Diego Bay,  now ranks its own  Crown City Magazine. See Paella Perfection
https://www.crowncitymagazine.com/
and my recipe for Paella Californiana
(It works!)

Overheard at Carlsbad beach:
Two, fifty something women, walking and chatting:
I need to find a different way to express my love. . . . I guess!”

on the beach walk

Overheard in Avalon:
9AM.. group of 10 20-something men and women in tight fitting sports gear.
“Yeah. We just didthe Alps!”

New show at California Center for the Arts in Escondido (CA)
Call ahead for a docent-led tour.
DesEscondido/No Longer Hidden: Public Address Art Exhibition
September 29 – November 18, 2018
artcenter.org

LE FRANCAIS A l’HONNEUR : FRENCH IS IN!

Vive le bilinguisme :
https://france-amerique.com/fr/the-boom-in-dual-language-classes-in-new-york-2-3-demand-is-high-enough-to-open-50-more-schools/?

word: https://www.hopper.com/fr/corp/about.html

Who says French is moribund?
What is POURRIEL ?  C’est pas joli ca ?
Let me break the word down for English speakers:
Courriel=e-mail
Pourri= rotten
Pourriel= rotten emails (I surmise?) = SPAM !!!!!!!!!!
And you can reserve your plane ticket while doing so!
https://www.hopper.com/fr/corp/about.html

De Marrakech à l’ONU, la quête d’empowerment de trois jeunes Marocains

News from Morocco:
A new museum in Marrakech dedicated to WATER
https://lepetitjournal.com/rabat/lun-des-joyaux-de-marrakech-le-musee-pour-la-civilisation-de-leau-240269

Moroccans and water conservation:
https://www.pri.org/stories/2018-03-29/these-moroccans-are-turning-foggy-days-solution-their-water-crisis

A TECH CAMP FOR GIRLS!
PRI’s The World: Morocco and women’s career dreams
https://www.pri.org/stories/2018-09-11/these-girls-morocco-tech-camp-presents-rare-opportunity-pursue-their-career?

For these girls in Morocco, a tech camp presents a rare opportunity to pursue their career dreams

PRACTICE FRENCH IN THE US:
Practice your French in Louisiana : On parle français en Louisiane
https://france-amerique.com/en/louisianas-application-to-la-francophonie-to-be-determined-in-october/

Brush up on your provençal:
https://lepetitjournal.com/culture/labecedaire-des-expressions-provencales-225937

Provence: Les Romanichels (gypsies)
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/18/world/europe/catalan-gypsies-perpignan-france.html

Book news:
Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories
Ebook out soon on Amazon.com
NEXT:
Le Riad au Bord de l’Oued (French version)

Comme toujours,  as always:

Bismillah
and Bon Appétit!

The Kasbah Chronicles: May 2018, Vietnam (Part 1), Morocco, and more

The Kasbah Chronicles
(now in its 10th year!)
My Most Excellent Vietnam Adventure: Part 1

Has it really been 3 months since I last published The Kasbah Chronicles? You will soon understand why.

Contents:
On a “roll” in Vietnam
Dining à la Hitchcock
Feasting à la Marocaine in Oceanside (CA)
Presentations and book signings
My “mentee” graduates!
Links of interest
Morocco and beyond
BOOK CLUB BINGO IN SAN DIEGO!
Get a special discount and come meet 22 nationally known authors.

Shopping in Hanoi

 Musings:
Yes, I have been on a roll. . .A Vietnamese egg roll that is..
This will explain my tardiness: I spent 3 weeks in Vietnam in April. Thus, March was spent preparing for the trip, in April I ATE MY WAY THROUGH VIETNAM from North to South, and May finds me roaming the aisles of local Asian markets to locate the ingredients with which to prepare my newly acquired recipes!

My travels will take up at least two editions of The Kasbah Chronicles. .. so please stay tuned for Part 2.

At a zillion dongs (actually 22,000 to the dollar)

how could we go wrong? Vietnam is fascinating, welcoming, and affordable. As I did when went I travelled to Chile two years ago, I planned my own tour using Asiatica.com,a Hanoi-based tour operator found on the Internet. China Southern Airlines(discovered while perusing Trip Advisor) flew Amy and me (a most compatible roommate), in cocooned comfort (business class), from LAX to Hanoi and return. As I mentioned above, my requests to our dedicated agent, Phoebe, of Asiatica, was to forego war memorials, tunnels, and war museums. All we wanted were cooking classes, markets, and local eateries… Boy, did she deliver! If you want suggestions for our itinerary, shoot me an email.(oops, I almost forgot to mention we also spent 2 days in Angkor Watt.…)

My photos tell part of the story:
Hanoi:Hectic, fun, historic, and better yet, food, food, food… Great cooking class with a local instructor in her home, a farm house outside Hanoi. Mandy (www.cookinginhanoi.wordpress.com) taught us all about crab soup and la lotleaves. Can’t wait to find some here!

 

la lot leaves eggrolls:


and an exquisite salad of fresh banana blossom

Hanoi has a mosque!

We soldiered on under a warmish rain through the insanely busy narrow streets of Old Hanoi, past dozens of pocket-sized shops. Shades of a Moroccan souk came to mind. The merchandise was quite different however. When saturation set in signaling an empty stomach, we dashed into a stall to sit in child-sized plastic chairs (they are everywhere and adults usually occupy them…) While a trio of Hanoi teens fingered their cell phones, out came a young woman bearing a hotpot, the local version of French pot-au-feu. We were wrapped in a cloud of star anise, cinnamon, lemon grass, and cilantro, and dipped into the pot with chopsticks to retrieve butter-tender pork shoulder, vegetables and bits of fresh pineapple. And, to cap it off, an addictive blend of salt, lime juice, and chili (I think).

Ha Long Bay: Phoebe asked if we wanted to cruise on Halong Bay. Why not? She booked us onto into a Jr suite with Signature Halong Bay Cruise. Our young cruise manager, Mr. Cuong, fretted over us like a mother hen:

Our bathroom came complete with a JACCUZI! For close to 24 hours (I wish it had been 48) we cruised among the dozens of tree-capped islands of Halong Bay,

and dined on dishes worthy of an A list restaurant.

Sara, the on-board hostess, doubled as our cooking teacher to demonstrate nems, REAL Vietnamese eggrolls. Les vrais!

Hue:
The next day, a short flight out of Hanoi landed us in Hue, site of Vietnam’s historic Imperial City. Upon landing, our driver took us straight to Eco Garden,so we could experience life on a farm.
Have you ever tried to grind rice? It ain’t easy! We tilled the earth for sweet potatoes and enjoyed the fruits of our labor during an al fresco cooking class held under a riverfront cabana. Cycling among the lush banana and pumelo groves surrounding the Eco Garden really increased our appetite.

We were pointed to Hanh restaurant near our hotel. Our lunch encompassed such an array of local specialties, that Amy and I coined a new logo for them, When in Hue, head for Hanh’s, a strictly local hang out, where we joined the cook in the open kitchen to watch her prepare eggrolls, dumplings,  pho… and my very favorite rice pancakes: you get the idea.

Our four hour drive from Hue toHoi Antook us along the Mandarin Road, and past Danang’s bayfront. This industrial city caters mainly to foreign sun-worshippers who stay in the resorts out of town.

Hoi An and its centuries of Chinese occupation beckoned an hour south. The town’s architecture still reflects this influence.

he pedestrian friendly city center is jammed with stores and restaurants, including the most unusual Reaching Out Tea House, run by a deaf staff. It was heavenly sitting overlooking a tiny patio without any auditory distractions. (Yes, they have WI FI.)

Hoin An holds other attractions, including eating a superb banh misandwich at Mme Phuong(like Anthony Bourdain). I am happy to say, however, North San Diego County now has a plethora of Vietnamese restaurants to choose from, many of which make mouth-watering banh mis.

Ah, that cooking class at Mme. Vy’s: UNFORGETTABLE (https://tastevietnam.asia/vietnamese-cooking-classes). 5 hours of culinary bliss, instructed by a professional chef, and her numerous assistants. This extraordinary establishment holds much more than a state of the art culinary center. Street level holds a huge dining area surrounded by tasting stations… so many samplings, so little time (read more about them on my website www.kittymorse.com)from a guided boat ride and market excursion, to a variety of samplings too numerous to name: snails, banh mi, freshly made noodles, breads and pastries. My head still swims. We were told that Mme Vy is in the process of exporting her concept to Melbourne! Dear Australians, DO NOT MISS IT!
. . . . suite au prochain numéro.
Read the next edition of The Kasbah Chronicles for more on my Vietnamese experience.

My instructor at Mme Vy’s:

 

I already mentioned that we have a well-stocked Vietnamese market in the North County, in Escondido (CA). San Diego cooks will head to the enormous Zion supermarket on Convoy Street, but we live further north. La Sorpresa Barata(asianmarketescondido.com) has morphed into The Asian Marketbetween Fig and Date streets(. . .and that’s the story of immigrants…) Next door is an excellent little Vietnamese take out restaurant.

How cool is this request?!

When I was growing up in Casablanca we couldn’t wait for Hitchcock’s films to be screened in English at cinema Rialto. One of my favorites was The Man Who Knew Too much.

“New comment on my post “Kitty’s Bio”
Author: merri mullaney

“Hi, I have just purchased a tagine, can’t wait to start cooking. There is one recipe I have searched for, sounds crazy, but in the movie “the man who knew too much” there is one scene that takes place in a restaurant in Casablanca (K: it was Marrakech, I think). The chicken and olives and other ingredients looked absolutely delicious and beautiful. Is there a recipe for this dish, and also the bread served with it?”

-I think the restaurant Merri is referring to was Dar Es Salam in Marrakech where my annual tours used to dine in the mid 1980s, (http://www.daressalam.com) average food and very, very touristy) but the scene where James Stewart struggles to fit his long legs under the low table is priceless. I haven’t seen the film in years, but if they featured a Moroccan dish, it had to be Chicken with Preserved Lemons! Does anyone know??”

Presentations and book signings:
I will be happy to plan a presentation on Moroccan cuisine or edible flowers, for your book club or garden club. Just send me an email.

May: Private book club/dinner in Oceanside, CA.
I was flattered to be asked to speak to this Oceanside book club, one that has been meeting for 20 years. This time, rather than gather at someone’s house, the group planned a Moroccan dinner based on the recipes in Mint Tea and Minarets and Cooking at the Kasbah, at one of North County’s BEST patisseries, Petite Madeline(sic), (www.petitemadelinebakery.com) just about as far north as you can drive on the Coast Highway in San Diego County. I knew I was in good hands when Chef Marc Mialo said he obtained his culinary training in Australia, where, I hasten to add, they SELL MOROCCAN PRESERVED lemons in every deli! Australians love Morocco’s cuisine, something I found out when I visited over 15 years ago.
La Petite Madelinereopened for us past their 3PM closing to welcome the book club. Once dinner began, we were treated to mouth-watering renditions of a trio of cooked and fresh salads,

 Chakchouka

kefta(ground beef) kabobs seasoned just right, baraniyaeggplant and tomato tagine, with dates stuffed with almond paste, orange slices in orange blossom water ( all found in Mint Tea and Minaretsand Cooking at the Kasbah) AND ice cream bestila for dessert filled with the chef’s own lemon mousse (WOW!) I demonstrated how to make traditional Moroccan mint tea. At this writing, I am lobbying for this gifted and imaginative young chef, and for the restaurant’s owner, Christine, to add a couple of these dishes to their regular menu. . . Chef Marc would probably duplicate the menu if Morocco’s cuisine (and Mint Tea and Minarets!!!) figure on your reading list.(www.petitemadelinebakery.com) and I’ll be happy to come and chat!

Saturday, June 10: 9-5PM.
Book Club Bingo
San Diego’s spectacular central library
300 Park Blvd.,
Special Events Room, 9th Floor
San Diego 92101
MENTION THE KASBAH CHRONICLES OR KITTY MORSE FOR A SPECIAL DISCOUNT.
Call Adventures by the Book at 619-300-2532 and mention
KITTY’s name and you will obtain  a $25 discount
Book Club Bingo, a day-long LITERARY EVENT takes place at San Diego’s spectacular central library. All proceeds from book sales go to the library. 22 authors from around the country, all of whom are excited to connect with book clubs, will participate in seminars, panels, and book signing opportunities.
http://adventuresbythebook.com/autherevent/book-club-bingo-adventure
and
https://novelnetwork.com/home-author-connect

Saturday, July 7th: 11-1PM
A Taste of Morocco. Free and open to the public
Poway Branch Library
13137 Poway Rd, Poway, CA 92064
(858) 513-2900
contact: karen.baluyot@sdcounty.ca.gov

A GRADUATION:

My mentee, Laura, graduated from Cal State University San Marcos, where, last Fall, I had the honor of being selected as a mentor. Last week, Laura gave the commencement address to 600 grads in the college of Humanities, Art and Behavioral and Social Sciences! I had attended the opening of this latest Cal State campus in 1992 with 2000 students. . . It now counts 45,000 alumni. Go Laura! If you live in San Diego County and you want to know more about this fabulous mentoring program, shoot me an email.

Links of interest about Morocco and beyond:
VIDEO:

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20180215-the-north-african-breakfast-that-ended-a-war?
To makebaghrir, semolina flour pancakes, one of my favorite Moroccan breakfast foods, see Mint Tea and Minarets page 246. Serve with honey or apricot jam!

Moroccan oudmusic in San Diego:
I hired this duo for a party, and I can recommend them Alexi Rabay . (619) 250-4531.alexicanhelpyou@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIMAEflWPq8

Who “invented” couscous?”: A diplomatic quandary
https://lepetitjournal.com/maghreb-une-labellisation-du-couscous-moins-anodine-quil-ny-parait-223227
“Slimane Hachi, directeur du Centre algérien de recherches préhistoriques, anthropologiques et historiques (CNRPAH) et promoteur du projet, a précisé à la radio algérienne que l’initiative devrait réunir Algérie, Maroc, Tunisie, Libye, Mauritanie et même Mali,.. . »

Tangia:See Mint Tea and MInarets, page 124
http://www.bbc.com/travel/gallery/20170811-the-moroccan-dish-heated-by-a-hammam
Yes, it’s true, many families (including me, when I am in Azemmour) cook tangiain the glowing coals of the baker’s oven which is usually adjacent to the hammam. Tangiais great for entertaining, as it can be made the day before (I use a slow cooker.) Sorry, I haven’t practiced with the Instant Pot yet! View my recipe in Mint Tea and Minaretspage 124.

Your Next Serving of Truffles Should Be From Oregon
https://www.ozy.com/good-sht/your-next-serving-of-truffles-should-be-from-oregon/85111
Of course: We have it all, right here, in the US. The Beaver State is serving up fancy fungi that might be just as good as the imported varieties.

“Food for thought” à la française:
https://france-amerique.com/fr/is-francophonie-part-of-france-colonial-heritage/?ct=t(FA_Hebdo_du_5_octobre_2017)

Concerned about California’s Water history?
Rita Schmidt Sudman’sis an expert on the subject.
and a long time observer of the California water scene. She led the Water Education Foundation for over 30 years. Her insight into the historic and current water conflicts provides context for the past and solutions and answers for the future. Hers is an anthology in art, history and story. https://watermoreorless.com
 
Les alligators en Louisianne:
https://france-amerique.com/fr/the-last-cajun/?ct=t(FA_Hebdo_du_5_octobre_2017
« Voilà un gros », lance-t-il en français. « Lui, il a plus que trois mètres. » Dans la direction qu’il désigne, sur un tronc d’arbre à demi-submergé, sommeille un alligator. Tous les jours, de février à octobre, il emmène jusqu’à 66 personnes en excursion sur le lac . . .

Need a graduation gift? I ship books!

As always,
Bismillah
and
Bon Appétit..

Tune in next time for Vietnam edition, #2…