Category Archives: Web chats, podcasts

Questions about Moroccan cuisine?
Join me for chats on the web!

Kitty’s Adventures at Space Camp! and.. upcoming tour to Morocco

Kitty MOST EXCELLENT ADVENTURE AT ADULT SPACE CAMP in HUNTSVILLE, AL.

TWO GOLDEN AGERS

(IF THAT’s WHAT WE ARE AT THIS STAGE OF OUR LIVES??)

https://www.thecoastnews.com/vista-seniors-cross-off-bucket-list-after-return-from-adult-space-camp/

Space Camp

https://www.spacecamp.com/img/2018/PG2018.pdf program guide

Where to begin? The article explains most of it. This was, for me, the kick of a lifetime. My friend Pat (www.patmcardle.com), a novelist and solar cooking expert , feels the same way. So we attended Space Camp..

Kevin Joest, a talented young composer, was a member of our TEAM PIONEER at Space Camp. Most members were young techies, space groupies as I were, as I am. Listen to Kevin here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HIf6qZ5xlU&fbclid=IwAR0Z6yGl2JW3wXha1yqQ7tXFwR3Qi6xnIKeFcrc03J5CNPXFTrdKyfCGF2A

Our great Team Pioneer (we won the prize for the best team!)

Chef Clementine feeds up to 850 children a DAY in the summer!

Then this: IN SPACE FOR REAL!!

In a historic moment of Elon Musk’s SpaceX, the company’s Crew Dragon craft successfully docked at the International Space Station on Sunday . . .

The Reagan Library in Simi Valley, CA: Fascinating!Step into Air Force 1 (the old one), a piece of the Berlin Wall, the suit Reagan wore when he was shot, learn how to set a table for a state dinner at the White House(really!!) and much more. A very entertaining and educational 2 hours—

Presentations: Oceanside, CA.

Lunch and chat, thank you so much! Encinitas Literary Ladies: 

“Thanks Kitty! 

It was great having you join us today for lunch.  I know everyone had a wonderful time.  I think it was a book club gathering that will be remembered for a long time!  I will pass along the Kasbah Chronicles information to the group.  We look forward to seeing you again some time in the future.  Have a wonderful trip to Morocco (Your book helped us feel like we’ve been there).”

 All the best, Pam

Presentation: SPACE CAMP ADVENTURES!

Kitty and Pat will give a talk on their adventures at Space Camp, July 19th, 2019

for the LIFE group (Learning Is For Everyone) at Mira Coast College in Oceanside (CA) (LIFE link)

Catalina and Avalon: a throwback to quieter times

Kitty in the media: Crown City Magazine,Coronado, CA

and

https://www.creators.com/read/travel-and-adventure/02/19/wrigleys-dream-thrives-on-catalina-island

TIJUANA 40 years ago!

The San Diego Reader is really digging into its archives!

A piece I wrote about 40 years ago when I was on staff at the struggling (no longer so)  San Diego Reader!! How things have changed!!

https://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2019/jan/20/archives-reader-baja-stories-1970s-80s/#

MY GRIPE WITH AMERICAN AIRLINES:

Our flight back from Space Camp took 5 ½ hours from Charlotte NC to San Diego. A little boy, seated behind my friend Pat, coughed and sneezed all the way home, while his mother paid no attention. The inconsiderate woman kept eating her potato chips, ignoring her kid.

I AM ASKING WHY AMERICAN and all other airlines, DO NOT HAND MASKS WHEN THEY IDENTIFY A SICK PASSENGER. That kid infected half the plane (indeed, 2 weeks later, Pat still had a good case of bronchitis.) SHAME ON THE MOTHER.

The Kasbah Chronicles August 2017

Musings:

Everyone wins in Toulouse!
Cruising the Canal du Midi
Invasion of the Ripe Tomatoes
Recipe
Presentations
News of Morocco and beyond
Links of interest
North San Diego County discoveries
Kitty contributes to The Vista Press
A French wedding menu

Kitty is selling: Moroccan items
Three piece 1930s-style, carved oak, vintage living room set

My last Chronicles described my travels to France in April to reconnect with childhood friends from Casablanca. We met up in Paris (1st part), Vienna, and Nice. Next in store is TOULOUSE. ( I have so much more to say about Paris, that Ill devote my next Chronicles to the rest of my Parisian interlude)

 

Dateline TOULOUSE:
Liz was the friend I reconnected with in what the French call “La Ville Rose” so named for its abundance of red brick buildings (in Morocco, we call Marrakech “The Pink City” as well).

Liz and I both attended the lycée in Casablanca, and she hosted the very LAST party I attended before I set off for Tangier with my mother and brother in August 1964 to catch the boat that would bring us to the US.

A few decades later, my friend was waiting for me at the charming Blagnac airport, all smiles, and looking much as I remembered her (and she immediately whisked me off to a bakery to sample fenétra, a special bread. What a friend!

Many of my lycée classmates headed to Toulouse to go to university. Fifty years on, I wished I had gone to visit them at the time. Students make up 1/10th of the population in this town of 900,000 inhabitants.

Toulouse, aka (as well) la Cité des Violettes, straddles two major waterways: the wide river Garonne, one of France’s longest. When the sun is out, hundreds of étudiants sun themselves on its grassy banks. And the placid, 17th century, man-made Canal du Midi, that stretches between the Garonne and the Mediterranean to the west and the Gironde estuary near Bordeaux. More important for gourmets, is the fact that Toulouse is the navel of the universe for cassoulet, and for foie gras, which I sampled in numerous iterations over three days —— along with Liz’s home-made cassoulet, stuffed with the region’s famed saucisses.

But first things first: We hot-footed it out of the spotless metro the next morning, onto Toulouse’s wide Alléees Jean Jaurès in the centre ville, near Les Américains, a café bistrot ideal for people watching. Liz was on a mission: to reach le marché Cristal on the Blvd de Strasbourg before closing time. For a list, seehttp://www.toulouseinfos.fr/pratique/decouverte-de-toulouse/9264-marches-toulouse.html)

I tried not to trip as I craned my neck to look up at the handsome brick buildings along the tree-lined boulevard. In minutes, we were engulfed in the colorful sounds of the daily marché .Asperges! Tomates! Champignons! Poulet de Ferme! And some Moroccan: Labès, madame! Many vendors hailed from North Africa. Slightly breathless, and loaded down with a cabas (bag) filled with produce, we took a seat at a table outside the Rose de Tunis café, a few blocks away. Nothing like a glass of piping-hot mint tea and a honey pastry to set you back on the right track.

Thus fortified, we boarded the free shuttle that crisscrosses downtown,along the narrow streets,  lined with universities and historic sights: the imposing fifth century basilique Sainte Marie de Toulouse or Notre Dame La Daurade, with its black Madonna; the Gothic style Couvent des Jacobins started in 1230, with its palm-tree shaped pillars. We got off at the Office du Tourisme in the Donjon du Capitole, which borders the football field-size Place du Capitole not far from the 4th century Eglise St Pierre des Cuisines. The cuisine refers to the Latin “coquinis” or food stalls that once occupied the neighborhood. St Pierre des Cuisines is the oldest church in Southwest France — there you have it, even saints think about food.

A few zigs and a zag later, we reached the banks of the Garonne. On this glorious day, students were out en masse, sunning themselves on the lawn, or dangling their feet above the water. Liz had more for me to see. She had me cuddle up to the statue of local songwriter Claude Nougaro, one of my teenage heartthrob.

My friend needed a ripe wheel of Brie, and knew we would find the perfect fromage at SENA FROMAGER, across the street from the Marché des Carmes, the historic covered market. SENA has been in business for 6 generations. Indeed, the young vendor behind the counter was busy upholding tradition, and handing out samples. http://www.senafromager.com/contact.html.

Liz had promised me an unforgettable lunch, and she delivered once again. The airy and wide-open La Cantine de l’Opera lies on the Allées Jean-Jaurès, near Place du Capitole. Chef Stéphane’s seasonal menu changes daily and encompasses all of Toulouse’s gastronomic riches, from foie gras de canard and cassoulet toulousain aux haricots tarbais (bien sur) to Jambon Noir and Tartare de Boeuf. http://lesjardinsdelopera.fr/la-carte-de-la-cantine. You can’t miss the big green frog that decorates the entrance.

PHOTO

We needed to make one more stop before taking the metro home — at the Terre de Pastel (www.terredepastel.com) a charming magasin that sells everything related to the violet, L’Or Bleu de Toulouse (the Blue Gold of Toulouse) the city’s symbol, imported centuries ago from the palace of the Sultan of Constantinople. I purchased tins of candied violets, the same delicate treats that I once received from my French grandmother.

My friend had saved the best (among the best) for last: a day’s cruise on the Canal du Midi. Her friend Bruno’s flat-bottomed péniche is the classic way to explore one of France’s most scenic waterways. I was living a dream, navigating the canal at 3 miles an hour, keeping pace with the cyclists waving from the shore, and gliding under the dappled shade of an arch of centuries old plane trees. Liz had planned lunch along the canal, near the lock at the Ecluse du Castanet (http://www.l-ecluse-de-castanet.fr). I stepped out of my dream into a postcard: a flower-filled chalet, once the home of the lock keeper, now a restaurant on the water. My Salade Océane would have fed four. Did I mention more foie gras? And scallops in garlic butter? I waddled back onto the péniche, and let the lapping of the water induce a gluttony-induced nap.

For the best couscous in Toulouse:
http://www.lexpress.fr/recherche?q=couscous+toulouse

ww.lexpress.fr/styles/saveurs/restaurant/toulouse-a-la-pente-douce-hamid-miss-atteint-des-sommets_1897702.html

One of the peculiarities of this man-made ribbon of water is that the CANAL flows OVER the freeway . . . What a way to escape the busy traffic below.

I am already plotting to return to La Ville Rose.

 

RECIPE OF THE MOMENT
Tomates, tomatoes, pomodori, matisha=BLISS this month

PHOTO

My current favorite:

Soft White Bread (forgive me)
Goat Cheese
Sliced, sun-kissed tomato right off the vine
Lemon pepper

My interview on Pink Pangea

This lovely travel site bills itself as a travel site for women.

Very interesting and informative, and they published an interview about Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories

Published on Pink Pangea on December 31, 2015 at this link:

San Diego Living Show, Channel 6, NOV. 2015

This link to San Diego’s Channel 6, the CW, San Diego Living should be accessible until December 2015, I hope.

It was great fun on sandiego6.com

Monday, November 9, 2015

San Diego Living, 9AM

Mint Tea and Minarets

http://www.sandiego6.com/san-diego-living

Please insert the link in your browser if you can’t access it here.

It is worth it! Heather, from Channel 6, was a most gracious host. We had fun!

 

The Kasbah Chronicles April 2015

Exciting news!  I am to be a guest on A Growing Passion, a wonderful garden show hosted by Nan Sterman on San Diego’s KPBS station. Nan has gathered a number of “experts” who will show and tell how to preserve the harvest. Should be fun! The show airs Thursday, April 16 at 8:00 PM and repeats Saturday, April 18 at 3:30 PM.  The subject of this episode is preserving the harvest – pickling, canning, preserving (make your own Moroccan style preserved lemons!), fermenting, and more. For information on upcoming shows or viewing the current show online after it airs visit www.agrowingpassion.com 

I had the pleasure of speaking to a Global Studies class at C-SUN (Cal-State University Northridge) a few weeks back. I was thrilled to receive this feedback from professor of art history Peri Klemm, PhD.

“Subject: Inspired… “I made some Moroccan garbanzo beans for dinner with cinnamon, turmeric and other seasonings!!  I loved meeting Kitty today, so fun! “Thanks, Erin

Love to inspire someone to try Moroccan cuisine!

On another occasion, I was hosted by culinary students of Vista High School. Chef Kim Plunkett is in charge of a wonderful program that prepares high school students for a career in the culinary arts. One graduate is now employed at the Biltmore in New York City.

Upcoming classes and appearances:

Cardiff Library

Thursday, May 21, 2015. 6PM

Second time around! Join me for an informative evening and sip a glass of iced mint tea.

A Taste of Morocco presentation followed by a sampling and book signing

Macy’s School of Cooking

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Noon-1:30PM

Phone: 888-424-3663

Address: 1555 Camino de la Reina – Mission Valley – San Diego

Observe and have fun as I cook with renowned Chef Bernard Guillas of La Jolla’s Marine Room at the beautiful Macy’s School of Cooking. Watch us prepare a sampling of Moroccan dishes. Come early. First come first seated. Line starts forming 45 mns ahead of time! A book signing will conclude the class.

Menu:

Tomato, fava bean, and preserved lemon crostini

from Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories

Tagine of Eggs with Olives and Cumin

from Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories

Orange Slices in Orange Blossom Water with Candied Almonds

How to preserve lemons, Moroccan style

Iced mint tea, Morocco’s national drink

Saturday, May 30, 2015

For members only. Why don’t you join? I will lead a farm tour of North San Diego County for the Culinary Historians of San Diego. My admiration for California farmers developed long before the farm-to-table movement became popular. The California Farm Cookbook is still in print and available on Amazon.com. It features a number of farmers from San Diego County including the farm we will visit.  www.CHSanDiego.com or find them on Facebook.They generally meet on one Saturday morning a month at our gorgeous Central Library.

More later!