Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen



5-Star Reader Comments!


The ingredients of Moroccan cuisine are simple and surprisingly familiar, yet they are brought together in a way that is unexpected and exotic to the Western palate. In Cooking at the Kasbah , Kitty Morse reveals the secrets of this venerable cooking tradition, from savory tagine of lamb, preserved lemon, artichoke hearts, and saffron, to the delicately sweet and flaky filo, shredded chicken, ground almonds, and cinnamon pastry called b’stila, the piece de resistance of an elegant Moroccan meal. . . Online purchase information.

Kitty Award

“. . . Morse returns to her family home in the kasbah–the walled old city–of Azemmour to present a selection of only 70 recipes that nonetheless provides a thorough and thoroughly delicious, introduction to Morocco’s astonishing cuisine . . . ” Saudi Aramco World, September/October 2000

First Place –Cookbook Category
San Diego Booksellers Association, June, 1999

“There are several Moroccan and North African cookbooks available at the moment but this one worked the most magic on me. . .With Morse’s guidance I have produced food better than the one dished up at the hip young Moroccan restaurant, Momo, in London.”
The Daily Telegraph, London, April 1, 1999

“Morse not only offers a wide selection of dishes, from soups and salads to pastries, main dishes, and desserts, she also introduces us to her native country. We travel with her to the souk, the local market, where we walk among cackling chickens, mounds of mint, and sculpted mounds of spices. . . In the recipes you can find everything from a simple peasant stew to a lovely orange-cinnamon sherbet from the luxurious La Mamounia hotel in Marrakech.”
The Seattle Times Magazine, Pacific Northwest, February 21, 1999

List of Best Selling Cookbooks San Francisco Chronicle, October 1998

Cookbook of the Week Chicago Sun-Times Online, October 14, 1998

“The book is a feast for the eyes, with sumptuous food photography by Laurie Smith that accompanies most recipes, and atmospheric street photographs by the author’s husband. Morse also adds to the atmosphere in a fascinating text about the history of Moroccan culture, cuisine, and customs surrounding the open air market, the table and the art of eating with three fingers.”

Epicurean Magazine, September 1999


Have a Taste!

Shaved Fennel Bulb with Sweet Onion and Preserved Lemon


Serves 4


2 fennel bulbs, trimmed, very thinly sliced

1 medium sweet onion, very thinly sliced

Juice of 1 lemon or balsamic vinegar to taste

3 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1 tablespoon chopped cilantro

2 tablespoons preserved lemon rind, seeded and coarsely chopped


Combine the ingredients. Serve at room temperature.


5 thoughts on “Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen

  1. Linda Berzok

    Help! I just made the stuffing for the Seafood B’stilla in your book which I was planning to freeze and serve as an appetizer at a meal in December. But the last line of the recipe says to serve IMMEDIATELY!! Can it really not be frozen??

  2. Debbie Kull

    Dear Kitty,
    I LOVE Moroccan food but the only Moroccan restaurant is quite a distance from me. So I purchased a Le Creuset tagine at an outlet and your cooking at Kasbah cookbook. i just scanned the beautiful pictures in the store. Can I use the tagine in place of the Dutch oven? I do not own a slow cooker. Or is the tagine more for serving than cooking? I would really appreciate a reply.Ii can’t wait to try one of your mouth watering recipes. Thank you so much. DEbbie Kull

  3. Kitty


    Thank you so much for your feedback. Did we meet at the Le Creuset outlet in Carlsbad? If was just doing a demonstration there last week.

    Of course, you can use that gorgeous Le Creuset tagine instead of a Dutch oven (and vice versa.) In using my recipes and the tagine however, cut down by half on the amount of liquid I recommend. The L.C. tagine lid is so tight fitting that no liquid evaporates or bubbles out, as is the case with other dishes. I didn’t test my recipes in a Le Creuset, so needed the liquid.

    A tagine goes from oven or stovetop to table. If you use a Duth oven or slow cooker, than use a tagine for serving. The Le Creuset dish serves about 8 people. max.

    PS: Are you on my email blast list? if not, would you like to be? I send out recipes and updates! Just send an email.

    Bon appetit,


  4. cristina furtado

    Kitty Morse,

    I am a brasilian person , very interested in cuisine and an experient cook also. I belong to a group of reading and our book of the month é about Malika Oufkir, “le prisionnière”, in Morroco. So, I am offering a panoramic view about gastronomy in marroco . Searching for information I happen to find your interesting book.One of my dreams is to visit this country and after being more exposed to it, my desire grew even more. I would like very much to receive information about your tours to morroco. Who knows I could be part of the group? thank you


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