Category Archives: Vegetarian

Going Meatless?

NEW CLASSES, summer 2016

Coming soon, my Alaska schedule for the end of September.

BUT: My summer got busier!

Le Creuset Outlets is opening a new outlet store in San Clemente, CA.

Sunday, July 17, 1 to 3PM

Free and open to the public

101 Vista Hermosa Suite 628

San Clemente CA (Next to Starbucks)

(949) 441-7474

Contact: Alicia Peat: aliciapeat@yahoo.com

Join me as a I demonstrate a couple of classic tagines using Le Creuset cookware.

 

A Meatless Moroccan Evening

Tuesday, August 2nd. 6:30 to 8:30PM

The Spice Way

260B El Camino Real (Von’s Shopping Center)

Encinitas CA

Debbie Kornberg ( 760) 634-9709

Reservations required. Limited to 12.

 

 

 

 

EDIBLE FLOWERS—How to order

edible jacket 96pp.indd

Click on the Book Cover on my Home Page to Pay via Paypal

Hardcover: 96 pages

Publisher: Chefs Press; Second edition (November 1, 2015)

ISBN-10: 1939664020 ISBN-13: 978-1939664020

Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.6 x 1.1 inches

Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds

Alternatives methods of shipping until December 19th, 2015, in time for Xmas

For a signed copy of Edible Flowers, please send a check in the amount of

Total including tax and postage via media mail in the US: $20.00

Make check out to: Kitty Morse,

Address: La Caravane Publishing, PO Box 433, Vista, CA 92085

Email me at info@mintteaandminarets.com

OR

Pay via Paypal through my website, www.kittymorse.com. Just click on the book cover.

Tell me who to sign the book to.

I ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS BY PHONE, thanks to the magic of my iPhone and my SQUARE. Send me a message, I’ll send you my phone number and we can go from there.

Better yet, come and pick yours up if you are near Vista, CA.

I am always happy to ship signed copies and I can bundle books together.

Mint Tea and Minarets: a banquet of Moroccan memories: $30 includes tax and postage via media mail in the US

A Biblical Feast: $20 includes tax and postage via media mail in the US.

Alternatives:

Amazon.com

Edible Flowers

and

http://www.chefspress.com/books/edible-flowers-a-kitchen-companion-with-recipes

 Merci!

Edible Flowers is currently on these, and many other shelves:

Farenheit 451, Carlsbad, CA

Myrtle Creek Nursery, Fallbrook, CA

Barrels and Branches Nursery, Solana Beach, CA

A Day in the Life, Oceanside, CA (quirky store on the Coast Highway next to the treasure-filled Estate Sale Warehouse)

Hotel del Coronado, Coronado, CA

Solo on Cedros, Solana Beach, CA

The Spice Way, Encinitas, CA

The (world-famous) Golden Door Spa, Escondido, CA

Old Town Temecula Tea and Spice, Temecula, CA

Mission San Luis Rey, Oceanside, CA

Summers Past Farms, El Cajon, CA

The World’s Fare, Vista, CA

Books Inc, Palo Alto, CA

Mission San Antonio de Padua, Jolón, CA

Mission Santa Barbara, CA

Chaucer’s Books, Santa Barbara, CA

Tecolote Books, Santa Barbara, CA

Small World Books, Venice Beach, CA

Marina del Rey Garden Center, Marina del Rey, CA

Boswell’s Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The Book Tavern, Augusta, Georgia

Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh, N. Carolina

Kitchen Arts and Letters, New York City

Moravian Bookshop, Bethlehem, PA

The Twig, San Antonio, TX

. . . more stores and nurseries in the pipeline!

 The book is also available on Amazon.com. OR you can order a signed copy by sending me an email. Total cost is $20.00 including tax (in CA) and postage in the US ONLY. info@mintteaandminarets.com.

 

Recipes from San Diego Living, SD Channel 6, Nov. 9th, 2015 TV appearance

November 9, 2015

 

From Mint Tea and Minarets: a Banquet of Moroccan Memories

(La Caravane, 2013)

Egg Tagine with Olives

Serves 4

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, very finely diced

1 (14¼-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained

½ teaspoon sugar

10 green or purple olives, rinsed, pitted, and coarsely chopped

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 bay leaf

8 eggs

1 tablespoon chopped cilantro

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 tablespoon mashed preserved lemon pulp (optional)

Freshly ground pepper

Fresh cilantro leaves for garnish

BAGUETTE slices, for serving

 

In a tagine or medium skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Cook onions, stirring occasionally, until light brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Add tomatoes, sugar, olives, garlic, and bay leaf. Mash lightly with a fork. Reduce heat to low and simmer until tomatoes thicken somewhat, 15 to 20 minutes. Discard bay leaf. Set aside half of this mixture for garnish.

In a bowl, beat eggs, cilantro, cumin, preserved lemon pulp, and pepper. Add to tomato mixture. Cook, stirring gently, until eggs are not quite set. Garnish with the reserved tomato mixture and cilantro. Serve immediately with crusty bread.


 From Cooking at the Kasbah: Recipes from my Moroccan Kitchen (Chronicle Books, 1999)

now in its  tenth printing

Cassolita

Moroccan Squash with Caramelized Onions

(serves 4)

 

1 lb Mediterranean pumpkin or butternut squash

2 large onions, thinly sliced

1/4 C olive oil

2 tsp ground cinnamon

2 T sugar

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 C raisins, plumped in warm water and drained

1/4 C slivered almonds, toasted

 

Place unpeeled squash in baking dish and bake at 350 degrees F until soft, about 1 hour. Let cool. Peel and cut into serving pieces and place in baking dish.

 

Cook the onions in the oil, with the cinnamon, sugar, salt, and pepper, until very soft, about 15 minutes. Add the raisins and cook 5 minutes longer. Spread the mixture over the squash, cover with foil, and return to the oven to heat for 20 minutes.

Boo-Hoo, it’s Halloween in 2013! Time for pumpkin chorba soup!

 

Greetings on a sunny, Southern California, Fall afternoon. Halloween and

 

Thanksgiving are just around the corner, citrus trees are laden with ripening

 

fruit (another record crop awaits!), and golden, apple-sized figs still hang on

 

to our  tree for dear life. And birds find our our Pom Wonderful pomegranates

 

bursting open with sweetness irresistible.

 

 

I love the onset of Fall, here, in San Diego County, or anywhere else. Nature,

 

it seems puts forth its final burst of beauty, a mature one  tinged with the

 

colors of experience, of a brief, sun-drenched life. I can’t explain why, but

 

one of my favorite images of Fall is one of fading anemones in various shades of

 

pink drooping languidly over a blue vase. The artist is long erased from my

 

brain.

 

 And then there is  Halloween. Our location, off a busy street, has never been

 

conducive to enticing young children up our steep driveway. Yet, every year,

 

hoping a young visitor might break the mold, I stock up on Snicker bars, Crunch

 

bars, and Reese peanut butter cups (my husband’s favorites!) I would much rather

 

give away a wedge of Vache qui Rit cheese, or a plump Medjool date. That line of

 

thinking according to my husband, is distinctly “unamerican!”

 

 So what do you do when life hands you a carved pumpkin, and you don’t want to throw it away? Make pumpkin chorba!

Kitty’s Pumpkin, Tomato, and Vermicelli Soup

 

Serves 4 

 

In Morocco, chorba is a catch-all word for vegetable soup incorporating vermicelli broken up into tiny pieces. A bowl of steaming chorba is standard fare in many Moroccan households on chilly evenings. This soup is usually fairly thick, but you can thin it by adding a little milk.

 

 

1 medium onion

 

4 whole cloves

 

6 cups  broth

 

2 pounds pumpkin or butternut squash, peeled and cut into chunks

 

4 stalks celery, coarsely chopped

 

5 medium tomatoes (or 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes), quartered

 

12 sprigs cilantro, tied with string

 

1/4 teaspoon turmeric

 

1/4 cup broken up capellini, or angel hair pasta

 

1 to 2 cups milk

 

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

 

Wedges of lemon

 

 

         Stud the onion with the cloves. In a large saucepan or soup pot, combine the broth, squash, celery, tomatoes, cilantro, and turmeric. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, and cook until vegetables are tender, 30 to 40 minutes. Drain, reserving broth in a bowl.

 

         Discard the onion, cloves, and cilantro.

 

         In a blender, food processor or ricer, puree the vegetables in increments, adding the reserved broth a little at a time to obtain a smooth, thick puree. Return the soup to the pan. Bring to a simmer. Break up the pasta into 1-inch pieces and add to the soup. Simmer until pasta is cooked, 8 to 10 minutes. Add 1 cup milk or more for a thinner soup, and heat through.  Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.


From The Vegetarian Table: North Africa by Kitty Morse. (Chronicle Books, 1996)

 

 

 

Happy Thanksgiving from the kasbah

    

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Photography by Owen Morse

Squash and Sweet Potato Purée with Red Bell Pepper Confetti

I can hardly believe that November has come around again. Somehow, the fact has difficulty sinking in when it is 90 degrees outside. It’s a little jarring to walk into a store and find row upon row of shelves stacked with benevolent Santas.

     November also means that Thanksgiving, my favorite holiday of the year, is just around the corner. This most American holiday turned into a multi-cultural experience for a group of American travelers on one of my tours. On that day, I had planned to be at the iconic Palais Salam Hotel, a renovated Moorish palace within the ramparts of Taroudant, an historic town in southern Morocco.

I explained to the chef the purpose of the annual day of thanks earlier that morning. He nodded once or twice, promptly gathered his staff, and disappeared into the hotel’s cavernous kitchen. Members of my tour took the opportunity to spend their free time combing the medina (old town) for anything that would bring to mind pilgrims, from feathers for their hair, to billowy skirts, Moroccan-style backless slippers, and artisanal pitchforks. They planned their entrance during dinner, to the amazement of stunned French guests. I overheard whispers of “Ces Américains!” as the twenty “pilgrims” took a seat at a table laden with pumpkins and squashes, as well as paper turkeys I had brought from the US for the occasion.

     Applause erupted on all sides when a group of beaming waiters in starched white coats marched in, holding aloft not one, but two, glistening, honey-basted turkeys studded with crimson hibiscus blossoms. The stuffing? The chef had given it a Moroccan twist – a blend of sweetened couscous, plump raisins and chopped dates faintly touched with cinnamon. Perhaps the most memorable moment arrived when a young waiter came up to me as we were leaving, and asked:

     “Madame, the American turkey it is very tasty, but can I have the paper ones to take home?”

     Why not try a Moroccan-inspired side dish for your Thanksgiving turkey? For this special occasion, I would like to share a recipe from my latest book, Mint Tea and Minarets: A Banquet of Moroccan Memories (November 2012) (http://mintteaandminarets.com), or at 

http://www.amazon.com/Mint-Tea-Minarets-Moroccan-Memories

 

Squash and Sweet Potato Purée with Red Bell Pepper Confetti

Serves 4

1½ pounds butternut, Mediterranean, or winter squash

2 medium sweet potatoes

½ cup milk or broth

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ras el hanoot spice blend 

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 medium onions, finely diced

1 red bell pepper, seeded, deribbed, and finely diced

1 teaspoon sugar

 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Place squash and sweet potatoes on baking sheet. Bake until soft, about 1 hour. Cool, peel, and scoop seeds from squash. Peel sweet potatoes. Puree vegetables with ricer or potato masher. Transfer to a medium saucepan. Stir in broth, salt, and ras el hanoot. Keep warm until ready to serve.

Meanwhile, for the confetti, in a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onion, pepper, and sugar. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are lightly caramelized, 15 to 20 minutes. Stir half the confetti into the puree. Transfer to a serving dish. Garnish with remaining confetti.

 Note: Ras el hanout (lit. "top of the shop"), is a traditional Moroccan spice blend, often available in specialty food stores. Consult another of my cookbooks, Cooking at the Kasbah, for a recipe.

 

copyright Kitty Morse 2012